Our Papers

We use a variety of different papers in our work. Many of them are handmade in different regions of the world. Each sheet of paper is made like a piece of art, and carries with it generations of papermaking knowledge. When you buy one of our products, you're not only supporting us, but artisan paper makers from around the world.

Various blue and grey artisan papers.

Here is a list of some of our most popular papers and how they're made.

Chiyogami Paper from Japan

Originally inspired by the designs used on kimono fabric, these papers are fade resistant and have a strength closer to cloth. The base paper is made from kozo, the bark of the paper mulberry tree, and processed by hand during the coldest winter months. This plain, white sheet is pasted to a wooden board and transformed using a separate silkscreen for each of the layered colors. Each of these layers are applied by hand, with the artisan carefully registering each color to lay precisely in relation to each other. Each layer requires the ink to dry completely before the next can be applied, making the process very time consuming and labor intensive. But the final result is a stunning sheet of paper.

Lokta Paper from Nepal

Lokta paper has been made in Nepal since the 12th century, and has been used primarily for governmental and religious documents because of it's natural durability and resistance to tearing, humidity, insects and mildew. It's made from the inner bark of the Lokta bush, a non-wood shrub that regenerates completely within 5 years if harvested responsibly. Designs are screen printed or dyed onto the sheets by artisans, the whole process being completed in rural villages.

Cotton Paper from India

Made using cotton recycled from rags and textiles, these papers are some of the strongest handmade papers. They are thick and the designs are silk screened on by hand. 

Katazome Paper from Japan

Another paper inspired by kimono prints, these papers have been crafted in Kyoto since the 20th century. These stencil-dyed papers are made by hand one color at a time, allowing the dye to absorb deep into the paper for a long-lasting color.